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Pegasus and Bellerophon, 'Slaying the Chimera'

£366.00 £305.00
Product Code
B54a

We've been asked by the Paratroopers of 16 Air Assault Brigade to make a large Pegasus and Bellerophon Sculpture and this is it in the cold cast bronze finish. It is double the size of our pewter sculpture and Bellerophon (the rider) is sculpted at 8" Tall. The overall size of the piece is 18 inches high including the wooden base, and 15 inches from wingtip to wingtip. We can add a cap badge to the bronze coloured base if required. 

Presentation Base
Mahogany Base (+£50)
Mahogany + Extra Blank Plates (+£60)
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Long ago, in the city state of Corinth, there lived a young man named Bellerophon, son of King Glaucus, though some say Bellerophon's true father was the god of the sea, Poseidon.

Bellerophon grew up to be a fine horseman, and when he was 16, he set off to travel the world. Alas, while in King Proteus' court, he angered the king. Proteus sent him to Lycia to visit the court of his father-in-law, King Iobates, along with a secret message instructing his father-in-law to kill this bold young man.

When Bellerophon arrived in Lycia, he found much sadness. Each night the Chimera, a monster with the head of a lion, the body of a goat and the tail of a dragon, swept down on the land and carried people and animals away. The bones of the monster's victims lay along the mountainsides and in the dense brush of the forests. Everyone lived in constant fear.

Iobates longed to please his son-in-law, but killing Bellerophon would bring the wrath of the Corinthians upon his land, so he came up with another plan. He would send the young man to slay the Chimera. Iobates was certain that like others before him, Bellerophon would be destroyed by the monster.

Bellerophon was not afraid. He was glad he could help the people and prepared by seeking the wisdom of a well-known seer, who told Bellerophon of the legendary horse known as Pegasus.

"This is what you must do to destroy the Chimera," the seer said. "Offer the goddess Athena gifts, and in return she will help you to find Pegasus."

That night Bellerophon built an altar in honor of Athena, and as he slept beside it, he dreamed that she appeared before him and set a golden bridle at his side. He heard the goddess's words as clearly as if she were there. "Sleep, prince, and take this charm for the steed. Approach him when he drinks from the well of Pirene."

At dawn Bellerophon woke, and to his amazement a golden bridle lay at his side. He carried it to the well at Pirene. There he saw the famous horse, the beautiful, wild, winged Pegasus, taking a drink.

Calmly Bellerophon approached, gently slipping the golden bridle onto his back. The glorious Pegasus became his horse.

Together they flew into the sky -- heading toward the Chimera.

As they neared the Chimera's lair, Bellerophon saw the scorched Earth all around and could feel the monster's burning breath, which gave him an idea. He guided Pegasus back to Earth and found a block of lead, which he mounted on his spear. Then he pulled upon the horse's reins, and again they soared into the sky, directly to the Chimera.

Bellerophon held his spear before him as they winged headfirst toward the monster. When they were close, Bellerophon plunged his spear into the Chimera's throat.

The creature roared, and as he did, his breath melted the lead. As it dripped down the creature's throat, the air passage was blocked and the fierce Chimera died of suffocation.

Bellerophon and Pegasus rode back to King Iobates. "We have killed the Chimera," the hero announced.

Iobates, stunned to see the hero return, knew he must try again. He sent Bellerophon on another hopeless quest -- to fight the warring Solymi. When Bellerophon returned triumphant, Iobates again sent him off, this time to wage battle against the fierce Amazons. With the help of the glorious Pegasus, Bellerophon once again prevailed, and so Iobates sent him to take on an infamous pirate. Surely, the king thought, he could never survive. But this time Bellerophon returned to the palace a greater hero.

Iobates realized that Bellerophon was a true hero. He gave his blessings to the marriage of his daughter, Philonoe, to the young man, and he shared his kingdom's wide open plains of wheat, its vineyards and its marvelous vistas with the young couple.

For a long time Philonoe and Bellerophon were happy together. They had two sons and two daughters, and Bellerophon's fame spread far and wide.

Alas, as his reputation grew, so did his pride, and one day Bellerophon decided he wished for the greatest gift of all. "I will ride my beloved Pegasus to Mount Olympus," he told Philonoe. "I will visit the realm of the gods so that they may honor me."

He set off on this last and greatest mission, but when Zeus saw him nearing Olympus, he was furious. "How dare a mere mortal pretend he belongs in the world of the gods," he raged, and he sent a gadfly to sting Pegasus.

When the fly stuck its stinger into the horse's flesh, Pegasus reared suddenly, and Bellerophon was sent hurtling from the horse's back. He plummeted to Earth.

The goddess Athena gasped. She could not bear to see the hero die, so she broke Bellerophon's fall. He lived, but he was badly hurt. For the rest of his life he traveled the Earth a lonely, crippled man, always searching for his beloved horse.

Pegasus never returned. Instead, he was received warmly by the gods into the stables of Olympus, carrying Zeus' thunder and lightning across the sky.

All our statues include an optional engraved plate on the wooden base. On the bronze statues the plate is jewellers brass and the pewter/ silver statues have a nickel silver plate.

To add a plate to your statue please select the option above and enter your engraving details. Please note if the engraving is left blank no plate will be included. If you'd like a blank plate please write this in the engraving details.

Please DOUBLE CHECK the engraving as mistakes will require a new plate to be made.

On the engraving the text will be centred and the font sized to fit the plate.

More Information
Price Code FO
Sculpting Scale 8"
Base Material of the Statue Cold Cast Resin
Height Including Presentation Base 18" / 46cm
Width of Base 8" / 20cm
Depth of Base 6" / 15cm

Please be aware that these measurements are not exact and have been rounded for ease.
As every item is individually handmade the exact dimensions may vary slighty.

Copyright © 2018 Ballantynes of Walkerburn. Ballantynes of Walkerburn Ltd, Jubilee Mill, Walkerburn, EH43 6AB